Levine Looks Forward To Challenges Ahead At Naval Academy


Bruce Hefflinger
PBR New England Senior Writer

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Levine Looks Forward To Challenges Ahead At Naval Academy

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Jack Levine

Class of 2022 / RHP

Player Information

  • Graduating Class: 2022
  • Primary Position: RHP
    Secondary Position: 1B
  • High School: Governor's Academy
    State: MA
  • Summer Team: GBG Hawks 17U Northeast
  • Height: 6-5
    Weight: 225lbs
  • Bat/Throw: R/R

Statistics

Pitching
87
Max FB
(02/22/20)
86 - 87
FB
(02/22/20)
74 - 79
CB
(07/15/21)
81 - 83
CH
(02/22/20)
Pitching
Max FB
87
FB
82 - 87
CB
74 - 79
CH
80 - 81
Pitching
Max FB
87
FB
86 - 87
CB
70 - 71
CH
81 - 83
Pitching
Max FB
84
FB
82 - 84
CB
70 - 72
CH
70 - 73

Levine Looks Forward To Challenges Ahead At Naval Academy

YARMOUTH PORT, Ma. - Jack Levine has no doubts that a college commitment to the Naval Academy is perfect for his future.

“I like it as a career decision,” the 17-year-old said. “I have my life set out with college education and a post-graduation commitment with a job. It’s something I can see me doing 100 percent.”

Interest between Navy and the18th-ranked 2022 right-handed pitcher from New England took off this summer.

“I reached out to them by email initially,” Levine reflected. “I sent a personal email to a bunch of schools.”

The connection with Navy soared.

“I sent transcripts with my GPA and in-game video from summer,” Levine explained. “I reached out to (assistant) coach (Jeff) Kane and he saw a lot he liked. From there it hopped up with phone calls and they kept up with my progress in the fall. They were very interested from the start and as time went on it was a growing interest.”

An offer in September from Quinnipiac was “a tough one to turn down” according to the Government Academy junior, while interest also came from Lafayette, Fairfield, William & Mary, St. Louis and Monmouth. But Levine found what he wanted at the academy located in Annapolis, Md.

“I like the environment of the school,” the 66th-rated New England junior said. “Everything looks appealing to me.”

Navy was enamoured with the 6-5 225-pounder as well after talks and seeing video.

“They definitely like my size and presence on the mound,” Levine noted. “They know I’m a project mechanically, but it’s nothing I’m not going to get fixed. I’ve been working with a new coach, James Cramphin, who’s been working with me on mechanics, working on hip drive and becoming more repeatable and efficient.”

The choice to reclassify also has proven valuable.

“They like that I took an extra year of high school,” Levine pointed out “They thought it was a mature decision that can help while going into the Navy.”

Levine, who carries a 3.4 GPA and plans to major in political science or cyber security, took a virtual tour of the university before making the decision official.

“The campus was absolutely gorgeous,” Levine said.

The 10th-ranked 2022 RHP from Massachusetts understands what is ahead when it comes to being an athlete as well as a student at the Naval Academy.

“It’s definitely a challenge, but something I want to prove I can do,” Levine said. “It’s an honor they see me as someone that can do that. I’m honored to serve my country, play for Navy and have that opportunity. It’s definitely going to be a challenge, but with the right preparation I can do it.”

Levine is not new to a challenge after breaking his back while deadlifting in December of 2018.

“I think the injury gave me a lot more benefits than you’d think,” Levine related. “Lifting with good form and the need for a strong core with baseball are important.

“I also found my love for the game. It gave me a path with what I want to do with baseball and I  learned about myself as a player.”

Dealing with covid just added to the demands of the recruiting process for Levine.

“I put my trust in my summer coach (Chris Welch) and my head coach (Cramphin),” Levine noted. “They had a plan for me to send out video and get in the gym a lot harder than normal. Still, at the end of the day it was on me to put in the work.”

Not playing high school baseball for two years was, admittedly, difficult.

“It was definitely something I talked to the coach at Navy about, a lack of experience in high school,” Levine said. “But they saw enough of me and what I can do in the summer. Now I look to get more good experience under my belt.”

No matter what he has encountered until now, Levine looks forward to the future and what he can provide the Patriot League program.

“I feel I will bring a presence and leadership to Navy,” Levine said. “I was named one of the leaders of my high school team, it’s something I’ve grown into at Governor’s Academy and I feel I can bring it to Navy.”

Making a commitment final did bring a sense of excitement according to Levine.

“What a great feeling to have a place they’re all in on me and I am on them,” Levine concluded. “Now I can focus on bettering myself mechanically and mentally in every way.”