Rhode Island The Right Choice For Toro


Bruce Hefflinger
PBR New England Senior Writer

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Rhode Island The Right Choice For Toro

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Nicholas Toro

Class of 2022 / C

Player Information

  • Graduating Class: 2022
  • Primary Position: C
    Secondary Position: 1B
  • High School: Lincoln High School
    State: RI
  • Summer Team: North East Baseball
  • Height: 6-1
    Weight: 235lbs
  • Bat/Throw: R/R

Statistics

Position
7.30
60-yard
(07/08/20)
2.00 - 2.05
Pop Time
(07/08/20)
72
C Velo
100
Exit Velo
(07/08/20)
Position
60-yard
7.3
Pop Time
2 - 2.05
C Velo
70
Exit Velo
100
Trackman - Hitting
99.6
Exit Velocity (max)
(07/08/20)
92.0
Exit Velocity (avg)
(07/08/20)
285
Distance (avg)
(07/08/20)
358
Distance (max)
(07/08/20)
Trackman - Hitting
Exit Velocity (max)
99.6
Exit Velocity (avg)
92
Distance (avg)
285
Distance (max)
358
Hard Hit %
Sweet Spot %
Line Drive %
Fly Ball %
Ground Ball %
Blast - Hitting
25.9
Hand Speed (max)
(07/08/20)
22.3
Hand Speed (avg)
(07/08/20)
83.0
Bat Speed (max)
(07/08/20)
79.0
Bat Speed (avg)
(07/08/20)
Blast - Hitting
Rot. Acc (max)
Rot. Acc (avg)
Hand Speed (max)
25.9
Hand Speed (avg)
22.3
Bat Speed (max)
83
Bat Speed (avg)
79
On Plane Eff (avg)

Rhode Island The Right Choice For Toro

LINCOLN, R.I. - When older sister Adriana took the Division I college softball route, Nick Toro began thinking about playing baseball after high school..

“I began working hard to prove my talent,” Toro reflected. “The better I got at baseball, the more I wanted to go to the next level of play.”

Freshman year Toro went to a baseball camp at Rhode Island where his sister played softball. That ignited the recruiting process.

“I did a couple PBRs and when you play for NEB they follow you,” the product of Lincoln, R.I. related. “Due to covid I was only able to send them videos.”

It obviously showed URI enough about his game.

“The recruiting guy with NEB said to reach out to them,” Toro noted. “He said they ‘wanted me’ … for a lack of a better term.”

Interest turned into an offer from the Atlantic 10 Conference school.

“They see me as a good catcher,” the 6-0 215-pounder said. “They like my bat and power, but what they really like is my glove behind the plate.”

Admittedly, URI was what Toro had in mind when looking at colleges.

“It’s in-state and it’s close to home so I have the ability to see family,” Toro said of the University of Rhode Island, which is located 45 minutes away from his home in Lincoln. “I know a lot of people that go to school there and they have great facilities and academics.”

However, there was a complication in making it all work out.

“The only thing that weighed into the decision about committing was their roster is full with all that went on with covid,” Toro explained. 

The return of somany players to the program combined with those recruited brought a dilemma for Toro.

“I had to decide on a prep school or a gap year,” Toro noted. “I needed to figure out where I was going to go if I reclassified.”

The Lincoln High School 2021 has that almost finalized.

“I’m in the beginning phase of reclassifying,” Toro said. “I’m pretty sure I’m going to Providence Country Day.”

It has the 13th-ranked 2021 catcher in New England looking forward to a future at URI beginning in the fall of 2022.

“This means a lot for me,” Toro said of making a commitment to Rhode Island. “I’ve put in a lot of hard work. Now I need to go out and perform and prove myself to everybody.”

After all, with Merrimack and URI the lone D-I schools showing an interest, the 17-year-old Toro believes he could have been overlooked.

“I know my potential and what I can do on the field,” pointed out Toro, whose biggest interest other than URI came from LaSell University, a Division III school in Newton, Ma. “My recruitment was kind of slow and erratic. I talked to a lot of schools along the way, but I wanted to play at the highest level - Division I. I don’t know if I showed what I can do the best way but in time I feel I will.”

Improvement is part of the equation.

“I’ve really improved on the mental side with calling games and my approach at the plate,” Toro noted. “I understand when I’m doing something wrong and don’t beat myself up. I’m becoming a much better player for it.”

More work lies ahead.

“Consistency hitting, arm strength and arm care,” are areas of focus according to Toro. “It’s about practicing good habits on and off the field and in the classroom.”

Kinesiology or business are potential majors for Toro, a 3.3 student at Lincoln who has had a number of influences along the way.

“My mom has been a rock helping me with soft toss, and much more,” Toro said. “Wade Briggs, my old pitching coach starting at age nine, helped me with baseball and life. Mike Abraham has been my catcher and hit coach since I was 15 when I started playing with NEB and he’s basically transformed me as a player with the mental and hitting aspects. I would not be where I am today without him.”

Where Toro is now is excited about what he can provide the program at URI.

“I’ll bring them energy and help produce runs at the plate,” Toro said. “I can control a good pitching staff by helping with their psychology. It’s not just about catching.”

Toro, who is expected to be mainly a catcher at Rhode Island but can also play first base, initially tried catching at the age of 12.

“They threw me into the mix at All-Stars when they didn’t have a catcher,” Toro reflected. “I remember that they had guys from high school come down to work with us and I picked the brain of the catcher. I wanted to do anything I could to help the team win.

“I ended up liking it,” Toro added about the position. “It allows me to show toughness and grit which I can bring to the field. I’ve thrived at it since I’ve been there. I like the bond between me and the pitcher. I’ve got his back and he’s got mine and we’re going to win together.”